The Chocolate Life

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Here is a list of bean to bar makers. It is not a list of ethical companies or artisan chocolate makers. It simply means that these companies all make their chocolate all the way from raw cacao beans to the molded bar. This list is the result of an ongoing project conducted at 70%, where members maintain a discussion and make attempts to verify that each company on this list actually makes chocolate from raw beans. The reason for verification is that sometimes companies wish to sound hip and trendy and so they claim to be bean bar. The idea is to have some type of definitive list going of who actually makes chocolate from the bean for RETAIL (not solely commercial, industrial, sale).

Africa

Madecasse (Madagascar)
Claudio Corallo (São Tomé)
Divine Chocolate

Australia
Haigh's Chocolates
Tava (factory is currently not operational)

Zokoko

Europe
Austria
Zotter

Belgium
Barry Callebaut
Pierre Marcolini

Denmark
Carletti
TOMS Gruppen

France
Bernachon
Bonnat 
Michel Cluizel
Pralus
Valrhona
Weiss

Germany
Euromar
Hachez
Herza
Ludwig
Ludwig Weinrich
Storck

Italy
Amedei

Antica Dolceria Bonajuto

Casa Don Puglisi

Cioccolato Peyrano
DeBondt
Domori
Ferrero
ICAM
Majani

Venchi


Spain
Chocovic (now owned by Barry Callebaut)
Natra

Sweden
Malmö Chokladfabrik

Swizerland
Confiserie Berner
Felchlin

United Kingdom
Cadbury-Schweppes
Red Star 
Sir Hans Sloane
Willie's Cacao

North America

Canada
Soma Chocolatemaker

United States
Amano
Askinosie

Bittersweet Origins

Black Mountain Chocolate
Cacao Atlanta
Cacao Prieto 
DeVries
Escazu

Fresco Chocolate

Guittard

Jacques Torres (no longer in production)
Kraft
Lindt (not a US company)
Mars
Mast Brothers

Mindo Chocolate Maker
Nestle (technically not a US company)

Oakland Chocolate Company

Original Hawaiian Chocolate Factory
Patric Chocolate

Potomac Chocolate

Rogue Chocolatier
Scharffen Berger

Snake and Butterfly

Taza
TCHO
Theo


Latin America/ Caribbean
AMMA (Brazil)
Chocolates Condor (Bolivia)
Chocolates Para Ti(Bolivia)
Cooperativa Naranjillo (Peru)
Cotton Tree Chocolate (Belize)
Danta Chocolate (Guatemala)
El Castillo del Cacao (Nicaragua)
El Ceibo (Bolivia)
El Rey (Venezuela)
Fenix (Argentina)
Grenada Chocolate Company (Grenada)
Hacienda Bukare (Venezuela)
Kallari (Ecuador)
Momotombo Chocolate Factory (Nicaragua)
Pacari (Ecuador)
Rain Republic Chocolate (Guatemala)
Santander (Colombia)

Tags: bean-to-bar, chocolate-makers

Views: 9916

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Replies to This Discussion

Sacred Chocolate is a bean to bar maker in the USA.
Holy Cacao Chocolate is a bean to bar chocolate maker in Israel (sold 49th and 50th bar today). -We're young still!
i found a great bean to bar in brooklyn called Mast Brothers.
Brad Churchill here from Choklat (www.SoChoklat.com) in Calgary Alberta.

We're definitely a bean-to-bar company.

Opened in August 2008, and to date have sold over 10,000 hand made bars, and over 35,000 hand dipped/rolled truffles.
So I thought this was an interesting new addition to Tcho and their claims of being a bean to bar chocolatier. I have been hearing rumors about this for the past year and, unfortunately, now it looks like it is official. This is taken directly from their website.

“We generally roast and convert our cocoa beans to cocoa mass (also called cocoa liquor) at the country of origin — then import the cocoa mass to our San Francisco factory, where we continue the process of making our chocolate from scratch. While more difficult for us, roasting at origin has many advantages: it’s more efficient and it creates more "value add" at origin. And we personally manage each individual roast, with one of our San Francisco obsessives traveling to origin to ensure all of our carefully-researched optimum roast times and temperatures are used.”

Now it sounds to me like they are saying this is a good thing for their chocolate?! What do you think?

So what happens at the other factory is:

1) bean sorting and cleaning
2) roasting (the most important step in flavor development)
3) winnowing
4) grinding of cocoa nibs into liquor
5) molding liquor into blocks

This means that Tcho:

1) Sources beans
2) Ships them to someone else’s factory.
3) grinds sugar
4) conches
5) Molds bars

Since there are a lot of companies who make chocolate from liquor, what do we call them? Sugar grinders?

Why has it taken Tcho over a year -- this whole time talking about transparency and saying that they do it all -- to make a public statement such as this?

I would love if someone who has actually seen Tcho making chocolate comment on this. I’ve heard several people say they have been there but never seen the machines operating and that they have seen boxes of cocoa products from Costa Rica. Will the next thing we find out be that they don't make their own chocolate?

I would love for someone to tell me that I have this all wrong. Please give any feed back that you may have.
I've read in other online locations that TCHO in fact DOES supervise the roasts. However don't take my written word here at gospel. It's only a regurgitation of my previous research.

Having said that, as a chocolate maker myself, I can completely understand the economics behind their decision to roast and process the liquor in the country of origin. Some of the following reasons are:
1. Cheap Cheap Cheap Labour
2. Big savings in transportation costs (roasted beans weigh less, and processed liquor is as much as 20-25% less than the roasted beans due to no need to ship the shell.
3. Disposal costs for shell are non existent
4. Equipment costs are less (no destoning equipment, roasters, winnowers, etc etc)

The fact that people have seen boxes from other origins may not mean what it appears. I am currently sitting on 3800lb of cocoa butter from Cargill. It's made and boxed in Brazil and labeled in big red letters as a product of Cargill. I also have Callebaut Cocoa butter in my shop. The boxes are labeled as such too. However beside that I also have over 7,000lb of sacked cocoa beans.

Just my two cents for what it's worth.

Sometimes things aren't all they appear to be - and that saying goes both ways.

Regards
They do say that they supervise the roast. However, they have claimed that they are a bean-to-bar chocolate maker. Can this be accurate if they use other companies to do a large part of the production. Even if they are "supervising"?
I would say so.

Not that I'm defending them or anything, but one of the most important processes of making chocolate next to fermentation, is roasting. If they control the roast and processing of the beans they use, I don't really think it makes much difference whether or not they use someone else's equipment.

Economically speaking if I had access to the roasting/cracking/winnowing facility to do all of our beans before we shipped them, I'd most likely do the same thing.
Sacred Chocolate is a TRUE BEAN TO BAR MAKER in SAN RAFAEL, CA, USA. I know first hand because I built the machines and the whole factory for that matter.
Hearts!
Sacred Steve
PS. Scharffenberger Plant recently closed, so you may want to remove them from the list...
Scharffen Berger's production has been relocated to Illinois by Hershey, who has owned them since 2005 iirc. That doesn't mean that they are no longer bean-to-bar.
Oh, ok! I suppose it is really Hershey who is doing the bean to bar then...?
I think the jury is out until we have more information. For at least the last couple of years, Hershey has outsourced all liquor production in their Hershey, PA facility.

Will they get (or are they already/still) back in the bean roasting and grinding business?

Does anyone know for sure one way or another?

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