The Chocolate Life

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Hey there all you chocomaniacs.

I started working for a chocolate manufacturer who would like me to make him some new recipes for his factory. It sounds pretty straight forward until you hear the conditions:
1.No alcohol
2.Fast production
3.prefer Classic style (ie.gianduja and nut based fillings)
4. Long shelf life (more than 3 months) so I can't use cream
5.No preservatives
The factory produces more than 40 types of bonbon already so I really need to be creative here

Any help or feedback is HIGHLY appreciated.

Many thanks friends

O

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Assuming you're looking for a soft center type material, you're only real option is to use oils of some sort instead of cream (milk fat or a liquid at room temperature type oil). The less saturated the oil is, however, the faster it will oxidize. Start by adding 20% or so of the soft fat/oil to your chocolate base to see if that gives you the texture/depositability you're after, and adjust accordingly...
thank you sebastien.it is a good option
Cocoa butter is a saturated fat that oxidizes slowly. Depending on the application, you could use either deodorized or undeodorized cocoa butter. Eastbluff Trading (look up ChocolateLife member Patrick Pineda) sells some very aromatic undeodorized cocoa butter made from Venezuelan beans.

Anhydrous ("no water") butter fat is another option.
use butter-based ganaches
btw, is forastero really your name? if so, too cool!
i tried some samples with cocoa butter..its not bad except i found the bonbon a bit hard.what would be the pecentage of cocoa butter versus chocolate or is there a way to make the filling smoother?

cherry i wish my last name was forastero :)
It will always be hard, and over time it will harden further. If it's a meltaway type center you're after, cocoa butter alone isn't going to do it for you (unless you fractionate, then MAYBE, but you'd only get about a 2% soft fraction that *might* work, so it'd be hugely expensive)

European-style butter ganaches have longer shelf life . . . worth a try?

Sounds like my type of operation........

You gotta go back and  look at stuff 100 years old when there was no refrigeration

Candying

Drying

perserving

nuts

Caramel

Nougat based (including croquant)

Butter ganaches can be quite shelf stable if you remove the 18% or so water in the butter....

Now for instance, honey is a partial inverted sugar

Dried fruits last for years

Pate de fruits are very shelf stable

Nuts and nut pastes/marzipans are good for 6 mths

Am I giving you enough information without "giving away" my farm?

Nut pastes (gianduja, marzipan) are good but you have to watch out for fat migration which will soften your shells over time.

Butter based ganaches are good, for even less water content you might try using clarified butter (you can buy it off the shelf from many restaurant suppliers). 

The gelee/pate de fruit idea is very good.  Combine it with a praliné/chocolate/feuilletine layer and you have a 6-month shelf-stable product with a great flavor/crunch combination.

Cream fondent based, citric acid to cut the sweetness.

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