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Hi all,

 

It's getting to be melting season again. Does anyone have any tips or tricks for keeping summer shipping effective and affordable?

 

I'm looking for insulated shipping supplies that ideally collapse down to save storage space. Is there a space age solution I should be aware of?

 

Also, are certain carriers better than others at handling perishables?

 

Any input is appreciated.

 

Thank you,

Malena

 

http://www.thexocolatebar.com

http://www.idreamofchocolates.com

 

Tags: hot, insulated, shipping, summer, weather

Views: 11861

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Dear Clay

Thank you for the wonderful insight, I am planning to start deliveries in India ( where the weather is mostly extreme ). Could you be kind enough to post a photo of the packaging- how it looks and where the dry ice fits. It will really be of great help. Thank you so much

Devika -

I would be happy to, except I don't ship chocolate any more and I don't have the supplies to build up a box. I should be able to do something in the next couple of weeks as I am getting a roll of insulation that I can use.

That will be great Clay! I can wait - my email id is devika.kandhari@gmail.com. Or you could just post it here so that everyone can benefit. 

Hi! Clay!

Can you please clear this

and the product being shipped was wrapped in plastic bags to protect it from condensation.

Clear == clarify?

When I was working with the US distributor for Cluizel, everything was kept in a cold storage facility at about 34F (1C). The packing was done in the same room the chocolate was stored in. Once the box was taped and foam peanuts were poured in, the chocolate to be shipped was wrapped in one or more plastic bags before being put into the boxes. Gel packs (if needed) were added to the box and the empty space was filled with more peanuts.

The plastic bags prevented any condensation that formed from wetting the boxes the chocolate was in.

Clay asked that I repost this from his LinkedIn group.  My father is a retired a doctor and he gave me this idea, save money by asking the hospitals or pharmacies for their cold packs.

 

Pharmaceuticals are nearly all shipped cold, makes sense.  What doesn't is that I have yet to find a pharma or hospital that has a good disposal practice. These centers will get in a crate of products, packed with 8-12oz cold packs--the same ones you buy, but they just trash them when done.

 

I asked one specialist if he would mind keeping a box of mine in his back office and when they got in shipments to just throw the icepacks in my box.  They have no problem with this and now probably have enough ice for the next two years.  I supply the office with some goodies as thanks and send the Dr. a few goodies for the family and everyone is very supportive.

 

So if you're looking for a very cheap way to get your hands on a lot of ice, strike up a conversation with your pharmacist or a Dr. you see regularly and I'll bet you'll have a mountain of ice packs you can have access too.  Not to mention it feels like we're recycling a bit further instead of just adding more to the landfill.

Great tip!!! I personally know the owners of two pharma distribution companies, will offer to trade them for chcocolate!
Take a look at these nice replacements for styrofoam inserts.
we cant ship in styrofoam coolers or liners, the cost is prohibitive. pharmecueticals are shipped to veterinarians though, so we recycle their boxes.gel ice is readily available on fishing pier/ marine supply stores though, only $8.00 for 24 1/2 lb blocks at the dock.

HI,

i have been told of plastic bottle filled only half way with water/salt solution and then frozen.

inside the box with the chocolate  insulated to prevent condensation..

Does anyone know if it works? could be an alternative to gel pack?

Uline also carries the insulated bags.  I've started getting the rolls though and making my own to fit the right size.  It's much less expensive that way.  You can also find mini cold gel packs.  They stay cold longer than the ice and condensate much less.  If you're able to spend a little extra, you can find ice packs that don't condensate at all (same ones used for pharmaceuticals).   Once when I sent lots of product to a very hot place, I made a styrofoam "box" from styrofoam sheets at Home Depot.  It worked really really well with the ice packs.

 

I am starting some early planning for the Summer 2012, and this writeup was a big help.

We have been using a insulated pack system from RNC Industries. They make a biodegradable two piece pad set and have many standard sizes including pads for the USPS Priority Mail Medium and Large Flat Rate boxes.

Control Temp Blue.

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